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Why Consider a Formal Education for Ministry?

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An intentional degree is one in which people who have gone before you have thought deeply on it and created a curriculum to give you greater direction.

I write often about movements that are lay led and not requiring formal theological education. I though it might be helpful to explain that, in many circumsances, it is exactly what you might need.

You will probably not be surprised that I think thing. I’ve earned two master’s degrees and two doctorates, with much of my programs in cohorts with other students. I loved the journey to get each degree. These programs / degrees provided me with the formal knowledge and training I’ve needed to serve the Kingdom of God in all that I do.

Let me share three reasons formal ministry education matters today: specifically, I want to show you how formal education can help you grow in your ability to serve in any ministry role.

First, an intentional degree directs your learning in ways that shape you as a leader, pastor, minister, or in any other ministry role.

An intentional degree is one in which people who have gone before you have thought deeply on it and created a curriculum to give you greater direction.

The classes are almost always developed by people who have walked the path that you hope to walk before you walked it and longer than you walked it. This means the topics you study will help you in innumerable ways.

The fact remains that any of us could open our Bibles or read other books to give us a better education. If I did my own study, I would probably read about historical theology all day. But I might miss some things learned by systematic theology or biblical theology.

I might not read about pneumatology and soteriology. I might not look at leadership. I might become more enamored with history than with the biblical foundation for our faith.

A smart person knows what he or she doesn’t know, and the directed …

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Source: Christianity Today Magazine

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